Tag Archives: business

The Example – The Garage Guy

Never assume.  Like all cliches, it is all too true.

Originally it was “Pride, Professionalism and the Shoe Shine Guy“.  Those special, random few who teach us so very much about life and business.  Sure, there are the obvious role models and examples, the speakers, the leaders of industry, the thought leaders everyone has heard, but then there are the folks that are right there, living the day-to-day grind, that are possibly the greatest teachers.  Several years back there was “The Shoe Shine Guy”, and now to that special list I am proud to add “The Parking Garage Guy”.

We all have known those folks, we see them almost every working day, year after year, toiling away in anonymity.  Sometimes we are fortunate enough to slowly build a bit of a passing relationship, a morning greeting, a smile, holiday wishes, and maybe even a quick chat from time-to-time.  And then every so often, a little nugget of information slips out that slowly starts to reveal there is a special person sitting in that security booth.  It took years, and finally his sharing that he was retiring at 81 (stunning…would have maybe guessed 65…maybe) to finally bring the entire story, all the lessons, into sharp focus.

To know Amha is to know a true professional.  He was always present.  He took pride in his work.  He ran a tight ship.  He knew who was where, in what car, where the good spots were, who might need a different spot and why.  That garage was his domain, and nothing got by him.  He was sharp, smart, respectful, polite, kind, but also no nonsense.  It took a couple years to realize what was there every morning, the lessons that were being shared.

Amha is the classic American story.  He came to this country almost 20 years ago from a “rougher” part of the world.  I knew the neighborhood he and his family had left, I suspected why, and it was sort of our “secret”.   I had traveled in those parts of the world in the early 90’s – it was not a good area or time.  Always liked to think that he enjoyed the fact that there was someone here that just knew “where there was”.  The other day as he shared the news of his retirement, he also shared more of the story.  He confessed that after not being well received here as an engineer in his early 60’s who wanted to work, he elected to not just ride out his years on the couch.  He chose to become a parking garage attendant.  An Electrical Engineer who had already had an incredible career, was a man of means in another part of the world, willfully and apparently happily, took on a thankless, anonymous job.  It all clicked into place when he shared the full story.

Professionalism and pride do not stem from a title.  They are not contingent upon a level of authority, a scope of responsibility, the number of people led, the industry, the company name, level of education, or even the actual work.  Everything and anything can be a profession.  Being a professional is a state of mind, it is entirely our choice.  Pride and professionalism comes from within and it is absolutely our responsibility to carry ourselves as such in all facets of life and business.

Pride and professional do not preclude being nice.  That was the real lesson that did not fully register until yesterday.  Genuine kindness.  Doing the little something extra for someone.  A greeting.  A smile.  Being present.  Lending a hand without being asked.  But above all, referring to someone as “my friend”.  It seems so obvious, but it is so often forgotten.  You see both the Shoe Shine Guy and the Garage Guy – they were nice people.  They were good people.  They work hard, they take pride in their work; their profession.  But they glowed, absolutely glowed, when they spoke of their family and friends.

And with the kindness, the pride and professionalism, went gratitude.  Being grateful for the opportunity to work, the place you live, the opportunity to help others, to build relationships, to be a friend.  We owe it to ourselves, our families, our friends, to our clients and our co-workers, and to the Garage and Shoe Shine folks, to try just a bit harder, to be just a touch more professional, kind and grateful.

 

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Filed under Business, Coaching, Hiring and Interviewing, leadership

Leadership, Goodwill…Good Grief

As the steady drone of “budget crisis” and “federal government shutdown” continues to pound every sensory receptor, I find myself thinking of that great accounting term “goodwill”.  By nature I abhor the entire idea of politics, and to even slightly touch on the topic makes me feel, well dirty, but at the moment it is the topic de jour.  And as is often the case when things are not going “well”, a quick look at things reveals some classic, fundamental truths.

It was one of the more interesting parts of accounting, and that is saying something. It is easy to take a shot at accounting classes.  To my rather unsophisticated business mind during those early MBA years, the idea of goodwill made a great deal of sense.  If the customers, industry and society believe in the firm, the product, the service, the team, the leadership, etc., well that is worth something.  Name brand, product recognition, the benefit of the doubt, whatever it might be, it all falls under that umbrella of “goodwill”.  It all has value and it is quantified, listed and quite literally accounted for on an annual basis.  It was one of those things I knew intuitively, but to see it recognized and quantified, well that lesson stuck with me.

The concept of goodwill became one of those things that was never far from the surface.  When in a direct leadership role, maintaining the goodwill of the team was always important.  Caring about your people, helping them advance their careers, find work-life balance, grow professionally and personally, they were all deposits in the “goodwill account”.  When times were tough, when the team needed to really dig deep, we had that “goodwill account” to draw upon.  Same concept has applied to business in general – treat the clients well, go the extra mile, under promise over deliver, treat vendors and competitors well, and just generally do the right thing…it has paid dividends.

Good governance.  Good leadership.  Goodwill.  It all goes hand-in-hand yet no one in our collective “ruling elite” seems to get it.  The very idea that a business would act in its own self-interest with complete disregard for its customers, stakeholders, suppliers and shareholders is absurd.  Every successful business realizes the value of goodwill.  They have to list it and quantify it in their Annual Reports.  It might be wise for “our leaders”, regardless of party, branch, or level, to take a moment and think about the idea of goodwill.  Dare I say it would change their behavior…maybe.

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Business, Life, and Alice Cooper?

Having a career that spans 40+ years is an impressive achievement, regardless of industry.  It is certainly not the norm in today’s business world.  The ability to have such a career in a field where success is quantifiable, where lack of sustained performance has seen all too many “flash in the pan” careers, 40 years and counting is amazing really.  In entertainment, and especially rock and roll, it is certainly a rarity.  Then, being selected to your industries Hall of Fame – just sort of legitimizes the career.

Alice Cooper, the glam/theatrical rock star provides some pogniant thoughts regarding business, the secrets to success and simply fundamental lessons in life.  And to think, he was quoted in an interview on Fox – strange days indeed.  Hard to believe, but then again one has to assume a guy like him has quite literally seen it all.

“…if you are living in this day and age there are way too many things to stop your career and not enough things to keep it going,”

“In this business there is two or three things you have to do. You have to be totally professional, always be there half an hour early not half an hour late. Be ready to work and do what you are supposed to do,”

“If you’re doing a movie, know your lines, if you’re doing an album then don’t show up and not know what you’re doing because that’s the stereotypical thing people think rock stars are…it’s not really true. We get in the studio and know exactly what we’re doing.”

“It was just something that was built into us, if you wanted to stick around you really had to be professional. Our band really believed in that. We were over-rehearsed, we never dared come in late,” he said. “What that says to me is that my time is more important that yours, and that is insulting. You don’t need enemies in this business, you need friends.”

The Wisdom of Alice Cooper – timeless truths and lessons – life and business – show up early, be ready, respect others, and just simply do what you are supposed to do.  Nothing magical, nothing sophisticated…the basics.  Though his wisdom has been gleaned in the crucible of life, the credibility of Alice Cooper is only enhanced by that priceless moment from Wayne’s World:

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