Tag Archives: hiring leaders

The Tourney – Hiring, Rules and the Value of Having a Sir Charles

The Tournament has become one of those events that has become a cultural phenomena.  No need to say “which tournament”, it is just The Tournament.  It goes beyond college sports and basketball, it permeates the public consciousness.  Pools and brackets become the thing of water-cooler conversation and office bulletin boards.  It produces drama, stories, heroes and goats, as well as some timeless moments and memories.  And this year the tournament was brought to us on every possible delivery medium the media has at their disposal, and we gobbled it up.  And in this festival of March Madness, I found myself thinking of 3 particular people:   Billy Donovan, John Calipari and Charles Barkley.

Find them on the rise, give them the opportunity, support them, pay them well, and let them do their job.  That is the model for really successful, long-term hiring.  In college basketball, or any sport, one would be hard pressed to find a better example than Billy Donovan and the Florida Gators.  Two National Championships, 5 Final Four Appearances, multiple conference titles and a winning tradition for 16 years and counting.  All of this at a “football school”.  Billy Donovan was hired as the Gators head coach and given a 6 year contract at the age of 30.  Was it a risky hire, yes.  But it was a calculated risk.  Billy Donovan had a very clear record of having studied and learned from some of the best in the business, a relentless work ethic, and an ability to relate to players, administrators, alumni and boosters.  Billy Donovan is a great example of taking the long view in hiring – find the right person, regardless of age or experience, support them and then let them do their job.

John Calipari has proven himself yet again to be the master of the “one and done” model.  His Kentucky team was again a collection of phenomenally talented freshman, arguably the finest collection of future professional players on any one team in the tournament.  John Calipari takes a fair bit of heat for his overt recruiting of those young men who clearly state they have no interest in being a “student athlete”.  His recruiting pitch is in effect “I will get you ready to go pro”.  Like many, I was initially put off by his approach and embracing of the “one and done” mentality.  However, what I have come to realize is that John Calipari is simply playing by the rules.  John Calipari did not make the rules, but he has become the best at playing within those rules.  He gets more of the best players to play for him than anyone else.  That is amazing recruiting.  He is also clearly an impressive coach.  He is able to take a collection of individuals and turn them within a 30 game season into one of the best teams in the country.  That is great coaching.  Someone like John Calipari should not be judged for abiding by the rules.  Don’t fault the person for being good at their job.

Mentors. Counselors. Coaches. Trusted Advisors. Advocates. Regardless of the title, we all benefit from having a core group of those “who have gone before”, who can share their wisdom, some hard-earned lessons, and above all be that voice of reason and honesty when we need it most. We all need a Charles Barkley in our life. Sir Charles is a unique character, and to a degree is maybe playing to the part, but make no mistake he is one savvy dude. And above all, he tells it like it is. What little I saw and heard of the various broadcasts, you could count on Charles being very honest in his assessments. If a kid did not play well, he said it. If the stars failed to live up to the hype, he said it. No sugar-coating. No hyperbole. No positive spin or feel good comments; just raw, unfiltered, and technically based feedback on performance. We could all benefit from someone like Charles…especially if they are as colorful as Sir Charles.

I do not watch a lot of college basketball, but what I do watch tends to be in March.  The Tournament is just a special event…it is fun to have on in the background.  It also reminds us of some great fundamental lessons in business:  hire well, do not begrudge others success, and have someone in your circle that will be honest.

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Filed under Business, Coaching, Hiring and Interviewing, Sports

Leadership and the NFL Coaching Carousel

The end of the season is my favorite part of the season, at least when it comes to sports. In particular, I love the end of the NFL season. This clearly puts me at odds with the majority of American sports fans. The NFL is far and away the most watched, followed and money-making business in sports. It is a monster in ratings and revenue. But to me, it is a wonderfully public reminder of the impact of leadership and organizational culture.

One of the greatest things about sports is the clarity of record. You look back on a season and the record is there for all to see…who won, who lost, who improved and who is falling behind.  And now in our ESPN, internet and talk radio world, we all are bombarded by the firings of head coaches.  It even has a name:  Black Monday.  It is almost comical in a way, there is a degree of consistency in which teams are in the playoff hunt, and which teams are firing their coaches.  Clearly, leadership matters, and sports illustrates that very clearly and publicly.

A few years ago we took a look at the Pittsburgh Steelers as a model for effective hiring and leadership.  This year that theme holds more true than ever.  The Steelers started the year 0-4.  At a time when most organizations could have panicked, the Steelers regrouped, focused on the fundamentals, stuck to their plan and continued to do what they do year after year.  They ended up finishing the season by going 8-4 and found themselves in the playoff picture by the end of the season.  No knee jerk reactions, no panic, no second guessing, no organizational crisis management, just solid leadership.

Then there are those teams where the coaching carousel never seems to stop spinning.  The Cleveland Browns just hired their 7th new coach in the last 15 years.  The Redskins are moving onto their 8th in the last 15 years.  The Lions just announced their 8th new coach in that very same time period.  And of course there are the Raiders – who knows where they are in the count.  Same goes for the Cowboys.  There is one other theme that runs through these organizations beyond just coaching turnover:  organizational culture.  The leadership issue is not just with the coaches, it literally starts with ownership and has permeated the entire organization.  Knee jerk reactions, micro management, fear mongering and meddling owners have left the franchises an absolute mess.

Call it old school business, but there is certainly something to be said for stability.  Good organizations foster, attract, and above all develop good leaders.  People evolve, they move on, they advance, they change jobs for a host of reasons, but a strong organizational culture weathers the changes and continues to succeed.  Players and employees come and go, and there are good and bad seasons.  “Stuff happens” as the saying goes, but good leadership and a strong organizational culture make all the difference.

Attracting, hiring and retaining talent, and especially leadership talent, is a relentless pursuit.  The best talent in the world cannot overcome poor leadership.  Just look to the NFL, the worst teams get the first draft picks, yet the problems persist.

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Hiring and Retaining Leaders – The Ultimate Example

Imagine if you will – the most succesful single company in an entire industry over the last 41 years.  And over that period the company has had exactly 3 leaders (the industry norm is to change leaders every 3 – 4 years).  All were recruited from outside the company, none had ever run a company before, all were under the age of 40, and none were “big names” in their profession.  Is that extreme luck or is that incredible wisdom and insight when it comes to hiring?

In the NFL’s “modern era” (since the AFL-NFL merged in 1970) the Pittsburgh Steelers have posted the best record in the league. The franchise has won the most total games, won the most divisional and conference titles, earned the best winning percentage (including every expansion team), earned the most All-Pro nominations, and have accumulated the most Super Bowl wins (six) since 1970.  And in that span they have had just 3 head coaches – Chuck Knoll, Bill Cowher, and Mike Tomlin.

The Pittsburgh Steelers and the Rooney Family are the model for sourcing, hiring and retaining great leaders.  They find them young, they engender loyalty by giving the young leader “their chance” and then supporting them in the job, and they eliminate ambiguity when it comes to expectations.  Above all else, they hire with a very keen awareness of the organizations culture – the leader fits the organization.  And think about what the Rooney’s do not do…they do not over pay, they do not chase the “hot coach” and they do not overreact, in good times or bad.  Oh, and they win – a lot.

Imagine if you will, a business that sourced and hired based on culture and fit, skill and abilities. And then actually created win-win scenarios.  An environment of mutual respect, of open communications, and realistic expectations.  Think about it the next time you are “chasing the market” for talent, or debating the “easy hire”, the “proven commodity”.  Maybe it is time to stop playing musical chairs and hire based on talent and fit, not on titles and past performance.  Who knows, maybe you can help your business go on a nice 40+ year run.

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Filed under Coaching, Interviewing, leadership, Sports