Tag Archives: organizational change

Leadership and Organizational Culture…How It’s Not Done

Bullying. Hazing. Harassment. Call it whatever one wishes, but the story out of the Miami Dolphins locker room is without question a glaring example of leadership failure. What has happened between Richie Incognito and Jonathan Martin is plastered throughout the media and there is no need to rehash the details, but there is certainly a need to look at the leadership aspect of the story.  Not just leadership at the top, but all the way through the organization, from the front office, to the head coach, to the position coaches and team captains, and even the players.  Leadership sets the culture, and clearly there is a massive problem.

I have never been an NFL player.  Played a good bit of team sports, been in a locker room or two, shared the banter, the laughs, the jokes, and traditions.  However, if there is one thing football players at all levels tend to love wrapping themselves in, it is the warrior culture.  This story has reminded me of the journey I, and the military in general, shared from the late 80’s to the later 90’s.  To say the military underwent changes in those ten years is an understatement; it was the pre and post Tailhook era.  It was a time when the entire military organization, and the Navy and Marine Corps in particular, underwent a very dynamic shift.  The pre era had its own culture of hazing, harassment, and various “isms”.  It was an interesting time to say the least.  It was needed…we can leave it at that.  As a junior officer, we were right there in the midst of leading that cultural shift.

If there is one thing that the military instilled in us as leaders, especially during that period of change, it is that we all are responsible for the culture of the organization.  We set the tone through our actions and our inactions.  It is a formal aspect of leadership as well as an informal, peer-to-peer, senior to subordinate, and institution wide issue.  We were all responsible for each other, how we are perceived, and the culture we fostered.  We had a responsibility as both leaders and as members of the team, to implement the changes.  We were also, above all else, responsible for those we led, our Sailors and Marines were the most prized, precious item in our charge.

What baffles me as a leader is that the Dolphins as an organization completely failed to provide the leadership needed for their players.  From the front office all the way down, their actions, and especially their inactions, created an environment that has certainly impacted their ability to perform as a team.  Martin left the team and Incognito is suspended.  That is just the obvious.  What other issues will hit them remain to be seen, but I highly doubt they will be performing at a high level.

From a leadership perspective, it all starts at the top.  The Dolphins organization has ownership, general managers, front office Presidents, Vice Presidents and who knows what other titled leaders.  They all to one degree or another set the culture.  The head coach is ultimately responsible for the players.  Did he know exactly what was going on?  Who knows, but he certainly created the leadership team of coaches below him and he set the overall tone for the team.  Should his junior leaders, his position coaches, have known?  Probably so, and I would argue absolutely the Offensive Line Coach should have, he worked with these guys every single day.  Did the player leadership know?  Well, Incognito was a Team Captain, so that answer is obvious.  But above all the other leadership failures, it is the peer-to-peer leadership that truly failed.  Not just as leaders, but as fellow players, the players that make up the Dolphins locker room allowed things to happen to their teammates that are just inexcusable.

The whole story is sad.  There is no other way I can comment than to use the phrase “leadership failure”. The entire culture of the organization, at least in Miami, is a mess.  In an attempt to look for a lesson in all of this, it is the lesson of poor leadership that keeps coming to mind.  Often times we are asked for positive leadership lessons, but sometimes the best lessons are found in failure.  The cultural fiasco that is the Dolphins locker room is a lesson on how not to lead.  That is about the best that can come of this ongoing story.

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Filed under Business, Coaching, Current affairs, leadership, Sports

The Lesson of Lane Kiffin’s…

…well firing.  While some rejoice, some wonder who will replace him, and others just revel in his public downfall, I found myself thinking of what we can learn.  Not about football, play calling, or recruiting, but about leadership, hiring and organizational behaviour.   Lane Kiffin came from a “football family” and had an incredibly rapid rise through the coaching ranks, becoming the youngest NFL head coach in history, as well as one of the youngest head coaches in college.  And with that rapid rise went an equally rapid rotation of coaching jobs…a series of quick changes and job transitions as a head coach.

So what have we learned:

Sustained Success.  When it comes to the whole hiring process, the basics still matter.  You need to meet people face-to-face.  Where folks went to school matters.  Candidates are a sum total of their experiences.  But above all, continuity matters.  “Sustained superior performance” is a phrase that really means something.  Someone who has been in a job for several years and has really impacted an organization, that is the true testament of their abilities.  Someone who has bounced around, “caught lightning in a bottle”, been a “flash in the pan”, or more simply a job-hopper, are living on luck and timing.  Much like Icarus, they fly too high too fast only to crash and burn.   Beware those who frequently change jobs.  They always have a great reason, but in the end the question has to be “have they really had a lasting, positive impact”.

The Non-Quantifiables Matter.  There are things that just cannot be measured, and leadership is one of them.  And in that same vein goes confidence.  Confidence of the organization in the leader is a very real issue.  It cannot be measured or quantified, but we know it when we see it, or do not see it.  Never overlook the non-quantifiables.  How a person acts, speaks, carries themself; their presence, their bearing, their communication, it all matters.  HR and Legal might not like it, but leadership is more art than science, and thus more about behavior than technical competence.

Decisions Demand Action.  Once a decision has been made, one must act.  Avoiding the inevitable helps no one.  If it is time for someone to go, make the call and move on.  It is better for them, it is better for you, and above all it is better for the organization.  An organization can withstand a degree of uncertainty during a leadership transition.  What it cannot withstand is an unending period of internal strife and division due to poor leadership, lingering doubt and general lack of confidence.

All of the above said, it might not all be Lane Kiffin’s fault.  The man obviously has great technical acumen and   did well earlier in his career.  Promoting the “hot runner” too far too fast is a common issue.  Folks who are doing well want to excel, and often that means moving up.  As leaders, we want to reward those folks via promotion and recognition.  However, as a leader one must recognize when someone is truly ready for that next step.  I really wonder if Lane Kiffin was ready to be a head coach.  Three times other folks thought he was, and all three of those times something went wrong.  It cannot be all his fault…they gave him the job.

Though I have no idea how technically competent Lane Kiffin is, or rather was, as a football coach, I do know he was not a good leader…you could just tell.  I am no student of the game, but even as a casual fan you could tell the team, the fans, and even the administration just did not have confidence in him.  Pat Haden as the Athletic Director at USC had to make a call, and credit to him, he made it.  When a leader has lost the team, the customers and the confidence of the organization’s leadership, it is time to turn the page.  Just be sure you hire the new leader for the right reasons.

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Filed under Coaching, Hiring and Interviewing, Interviewing, leadership, Sports